About The Festival

Welcome To NHIFF

The Third Annual Festival Springs Into Action With Films To Explore, Entertain And Inspire! May 4, 5 & 6 At Gateway Communitty College. This year Connecticut & International Films Dominate 2017 Festival Line Up

 

This year’s NHIFF line up of more than 100 films is represented by some of the most intriguing and thought provoking film projects of the year. The films cover a wide range of subjects with an emphasis on: Human Rights, Peace (without military intervention), Social Justice, LGBT, STRONG WOMEN, and many of the world’s inequalities and injustices. But, not all films are necessarily on serious topics.

There are many films to explore. Mix and match narrative features with important stories, powerful documentaries, comedy and dramatic short films, and incredible student films, animations, micro shorts and even advertisements! Be entertained, become informed and enlightened. LEARN. But, most importantly, walk away inspired and empowered. $15.00 a day is the best deal in town. And, there’s FREE Parking to boot at the Temple Street Garage. “Yes Virginia”  there is Free parking in New Haven. Just be sure to get your garage ticket validated.

 

So what’s playing at the movies? Here’s a snapshot of what’s in store at the 2017 New Haven International Film Festival: Connecticut and International film productions dominated the 2017 accepted submissions and hence the schedule. Three Aussie features from down under, one inventive Swedish “Bitch” (via New Delhi) of a movie and Friday Night’s Premieres of  “Food Haven” and “Gold Star”, both features by New Haven natives are followed by parties at restaurants featured in “Food Haven”.

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NHIFF opens Thursday morning at 11:30am with an opportunity to become immersed in Dramatic and Comedy Shorts throughout the day. Additionally, three powerful Human Rights films including: “Crows Of The Desert” based on the memoirs of Armenian resistance leader Levon Yotnakhparian to not only stay alive but to help save his people from near extinction in the 20th Century’s first genocide. “Paper Lanterns” is the story of Shigeaki Mori and his lifelong calling to tell the story of not only the many Japanese victims of Hiroshima, but also of 12 forgotten US airmen caught in the fire bomb on that day. “The Peace Agency” educates and empowers, when handicapped single mother brings together over 500 women to overcome their religious differences to promote peace and education in the conflict torn town of Poso, Indonesia.

Late Thursday afternoon “25 Tracks” features Aussie recording artists and then the Boston based Woody Allen-esque Dramedy “On The 7th Date” suggests maybe you should take a chance on that 7th date.

Thursday evening features the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe and the Solidarity Movement inspired by Pope John Paul II at a FREE to the public screening of “Liberating A Continent: Pope John Paul II And The Fall Of Communism” Sponsored by The Knights Of Columbus. The Connecticut Grown feature “The Frogmarch” depicts what can happen when a group of close friends go the distance to stage a substance abuse intervention with their BFF and then CT Filmmaker documentary “Leaving God” closes the evening when Stamford writer/director and marketing executive John Folis questions his faith and how it went astray from his beliefs in a very quirky and thought provoking autobiographical short feature.

Friday morning, gates open again with  “The Lost Village” about the lost soul and appeal Vs the gentrification of Greenwich Village NYC at the whims and profit of mega developer New York University. “American Road” explores the literary, musical and artistic resonances of the road in US culture, from the frontier to Kerouac and his heirs. Then, Australian emotional rollercoaster “BROKE” tells a compelling redemption story of a disgraced Aussie rugby star whose bottomed-out life haltingly turns around when he is "adopted" by a widower and his daughter. “Lavender Scare” is important and relevant! In the midst of the Cold War, President Dwight D. Eisenhower deems homosexuals to be “security risks” and orders the immediate firing of any government employee discovered to be gay or lesbian. Sound familiar Hollywood? These titles are bookended by numerous Dramatic Shorts and other Human Rights films throughout the day including: “Rigoberta Menchú: Daughter of the Maya” a must see 60 minute doc about the invincible, indigenous Guatemalan woman who rose from the jungles to defeat tyranny and eventually win the Nobel Peace Prize. Peace without a military or police intervention seems to be unheard in today’s unstable world. “A Bold Peace” is a powerful testament of how one small country has been able to do so. Costa Rica has been able to maintain peace for more than 68 years without a Military. At 5:15am a full day of screenings gets even more interesting with the Science Fiction feature: "Einstein's God Model"  that explores the connection between quantum physics, string theory, and life after death

Friday Night wraps with feature films directed by a couple of New Haven’s own. At 7:00pm, The World Premiere of “Food Haven” directed by Jim O’Connor, makes you feel right at home in the kitchen with the characters that make up the soul of the Elm City, New Haven’s restaurants and its nightlife scene. Or, just after the 4:30pm Swedish feature film “Bitch” at about a philosophical dog making her way from the streets of New Delhi to a better life in a new world, catch some Dramatic Shorts IV at 6:15pm featuring  “Split Decision” in the what if story of young senators JFK and Richard M. Nixon chance encounter with a palm reader and “Fireflies” when a Middle Eastern man is profiled and mistaken as a terrorist in a Boston Cafe that he frequents. At 8:00pm attend the New Haven area premiere of “Gold Star”, written and directed by the lead actress Victoria Negri, starring Robert Vaughn (Man from UNCLE, Magnificent Seven, Bullitt, Hustle) in his final film performance and Catherine Curtin (Orange is the New Black, Wolf of Wall Street, The Bourne Legacy).

All three Friday Night films and shorts are followed up by parties at three of the restaurants featured in  “Food Haven”. Don’t miss this very New Haven centric event.

Saturday, the festival wraps with 12 programs featuring another great Aussie feature “This Little Piggy” along with blocks of Comedy Shorts, Web Series, Animations, Micro Shorts, Music Videos, High School & College Student Shorts and even Advertisements! Saturday highlights several very important films by Connecticut Film Filmmakers who will be attending for Q&A and panel discussions. At 12:30pm be sure to catch “My Name Is Joan” featured in the Documentary Shorts block which  tells the story of Susan Drew, a woman who was born Joan Fagan to an unwed mother in the St. Patrick Mother and Baby Home in Dublin, Ireland in 1949 and the wholesale adoptions of babies for profit to the church and state. A Q&A with Norwalk Director: Margaret Stapor Costa will follow. Classical Music lovers shouldn’t miss the documentary “Beautifully Scary” which documents the evolution and history of Modern Contemporary Classical Music in America. And, last but not least, at 11:45, We close the festival when Newtown Native; Harvey Hubbell screens his latest documentary “One By One”. Captivating educator Diana King shares a lifetime of knowledge as she effortlessly instructs 3 students, ages 5-15, at her charming country home in Connecticut, making manifest the importance of early intervention, motor memory and teacher engagement. In the film, director, Harvey Hubbell V showcases Diana's personality, wisdom and approach to teaching as she shares and demonstrates concrete tools, techniques and best practices for early intervention and working with students- particularly those with dyslexia and learning differences. Harvey will moderate a panel with Diana King and other teaching professionals immediately after the screening.A panel and discussion will follow with Diana King, Harvey Hubbell and other professional professional educators. Seating is limited.

All films will be screened at Gateway Community College. Festival attendees should enter the College at the corner of Church Street and George Street in downtown New Haven.

Day passes for the festival are $15.00 and include FREE parking at the Temple Street Garage adjacent to the college. All parking stubs must be validated at the security desk. Parking stubs that have not been validated will not be honored upon leaving the garage. The garage can be entered from the right lane of  (Rte 34 N) Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., just after the intersection of Church Street.  

For more information visit: www.newhavenfilmfestival.com and join us at Facebook.com/newhavenfilmfestival. 203-247-4273

Tickets Available At: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2017-new-haven-international-film-festival-tickets-33535538699